Being a Chinese, something I want to say

Well, it’s being a long time no post @ ifgogo. Life is hard and I was busy. I’ve being busy moving from west Beijing to east Beijing. However, I think it’s time to post something here though I’m really not that sure I know everything well (Not a single man dares to say that he knows everything about the Tibet, Torch Relay Attacking, Duke counter-protest issues all). As “Chinese in English” for this website, for this blog, it’s just been too silent recently. As everyone knows that we China are going to host the Olympic Games this year, so being a Chinese, especially being a Chinese in Beijing, it’s really a special year for me, for every Chinese. It’s proud to host the great movement, to make the world running for a same good goal (via):

the goal of the Olympic Movement is to contribute to building a peaceful and better world by educating youth through sport practiced without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play.

But it seems that people are so often to be out of control (Yes, something really hurts, I know). Here are something I wanna say when I received tons of comments at my personal blog:

  1. Most people, Chinese, American, French, whatever.. the ordinary ones, are not interested in political details. They just want to lead a normal and happy life. So it’s really a bad idea to say that “all the French people are evil” etc.
  2. Due to some complicated reasons, we’ve met kinds of trouble. The Attacks to the Olympic Torch Relay in Paris really disobeyed the common goal of the majority. It’s not a good idea to mix sports and politics. If you are not a politician then you need to figure out enough truth before attacking the others or spamming everywhere on Internet. I have to admit that there are some Chinese people doing so in this post from my personal blog. I really feel sorry to see that all.
  3. To boycott the western media / western companies is NOT a shortcut(in Chinese) for the Chinese people to be richer, NOR a shortcut for the China being stronger. As I will say later, to make our motherland be stronger and our people more richer, we’ve got a lot of things to do.
  4. For good or bad, whatever… Tibet belongs to China. If you’ve never been there, never been talked to the people who lived there, how do you know what the people are thinking about? If possible, upload a video to Youtube. The more videos are uploaded, the clearer the truth is.
  5. To love our motherland is a good character, but it’s not just an action of updating our MSN signatures. It’s about loving your job, loving your family, loving the environment, and being working hard everyday, being helpful to others. That’s easier said than done. The environment issues are getting more and more serious, the global warming, the overpopulation, the extinct species…if we are not going to live together, we’ll then all die alone.

PS: I met a friend from German on MSN, just by accident. We chatted a lot and he asked me about my height. I told him that I am 179cm, then he said “that’s really tall, even taller than me(178)”. He told me that when he came to Shanghai, China, he found most Chinese people are shorter than guys from his country. So, what can I say? As a Chinese, what will you do? To tell(cheat) him that people in Shanghai is the shortest from China? To blame his discrimination and “f*ck” his family? Or to boycott this contact forever and even stopped talking to any German guys? Well, just stop looking for shortcuts to be taller/stronger, just stop deceiving yourself. All we need to do is to educate our next generation to be working hard, doing regular exercise, protecting the environment and paying enough attention to the health issues.

PS2: Some job must be done by the government and politicians. The government is responsible for things like handling issues with other countries, education, protecting the people, etc. Those jobs are really important, but being a normal people, you can not play a government official. If you wanna help, just join them first.

Please read this post carefully before posting a comment, thanks.

25 thoughts on “Being a Chinese, something I want to say

  1. dugg, I’ve been tracking the information from Hecaitou(和菜头) and Lianyue(连岳). I want to stand in the middle. Because I don’t know about the truth. I refused to modify my signature, and even was blamed as a protester for the Tibet. So, not support equals disagree?
    I am not interested in Politics and Sports and I just want to keep my personal action simple. Anyway, I hope the people involved can enjoy this game.
    MSN continues to I’M, on the road of fighting for the virus.

  2. “for every Chinese.”
    I can’t agree with this.
    Sorry for say so.
    What I care about is our people’s live, the game is just a fun thing making it better.
    But , if lots of our people is living in a hell , a fun game hosted on it just make it looks more evil.

  3. Though you may not be interested in the Games, it’s really affecting us. But I’m just saying that the effect needs to be considered particularly. For some people it’s good news, for some, it’s not that good, and for some, it’s even bad news.
    Your views are really reasonable and as I have declared in the end of this post, we need to pay more attention to our daily work and our government needs to do more for the people.

  4. Aw , have u think about that this blog may encounter the digg effect since u call us to digg this post? Be careful ,huh

    and in my eyes, the 29th Olympic Game is just a common sports meeting held in Beijing , nothing more distinguished than previous and next ones. What we can do is to pitch in to get everything we should do ready ,and then welcome friends from all over the world to have a good time in term of sports. Everyone and every aspect should avoid politicalizing it .That’s the key point.

  5. No, I don’t think this will encounter the effect. Only Chinese users will be interested and I just want to find more Chinese friends on Digg.
    The U.S doesn’t care about the others, they only care about their life themselves:)

  6. I admire ifgogo.com’s concept as a blog for Chinese people to express themselves in English, a language that is more accessible to foreign audience. That by itself will help bridge the gap between the Chinese and foreigners who clearly have a lot of misunderstandings between them, especially due to the controversy over Tibet, the western media, and the Olympic torch relay.

    Unfortunately, there are a few points with your post that I, also Chinese, respectfully but firmly disagree with and a few things I want to point out:

    Re. #2. It is really ridiculous that everyone is trying to “depoliticize” the Olympics. It has ALWAYS been political and always will be as long as there are different countries to host the games. The Olympics have ALWAYS been an opportunity for people to express themselves and their causes. It was true before Beijing and will be true after Beijing.

    Of all the governments to politicize the 2008 Olympic Games, the Chinese CCP government is the worst offender. It has treated the Olympic Games as a political issue from the very beginning. The Chinese people, too, treat the games as a political issue. Whether they regard it as a moment of nationalistic pride for their country (which is political) or they argue over the costs of hosting the Olympics when the money could’ve been spent to develop Western and interior China instead (also political).

    Asking foreigners to not “politicize” the Olympics is ridiculously hypocritical. What the CCP government and some Chinese are really demanding when they demand foreigners to not “politicize” the Games is for the foreigners to simply shut up because the Chinese government or people don’t like what the foreigners are saying. But how are we going to improve mutual understanding between China/Chinese and the other people of the world when one side is telling the other side to “shut up?”

    There is nothing inherently wrong with politics being involved with the Olympics…simply because it is inavoidable. However, there is something wrong when one side tries to silence the other side. If people in the West (especially pro-Tibet supporters/protestors) are ruining the Olympic spirit by being violent, should the Chinese people be violent also? Does this make Chinese people better than the violent protestors? Is threatening a Chinese girl and her family because MIGHT have a different opinion peaceful? How can we be friends to the outside world and how can we welcome out “friends” to China for the Olympic Games when we cannot be friends with our own people who simply might have different opinions?

    Re. #4. The vast majority of Chinese people have never been to Tibet either. Let’s not pretend the Chinese automatically know more about Tibet than Tibettans or exiled Tibettans or western people. It is true, many westerners have a mistaken and romanticized notion of Tibet. They are idiots. However, there has been plenty of ignorance on the China side as well. The problem is that too few people are willing to admit that and ask each other: “how do we work together to better understand these problems and find a solution?” Instead, everyone insists they are right and they don’t need to listen to anyone else or work with anyone else. How does China and the Chinese people expect westerners to understand? The Chinese want the West to simply listen and obey, and if the West still has questions or disagrees, then China uses the excuse that Tibet is “an internal issue.” How can we improve mutual understanding when the only options we give others are A) listen and agree with us, or B) don’t interfere with our private business. How come it is public business as long as others agree but suddenly private business to anyone who disagrees? Why are we so insecure? Why do we find it so difficult to accept that other people may have different opinions?

    Re: “normal people being government officials.” I disagree here. Every person has the responsibility for representing their country, not just the government. In this day and age where people from different countries and cultures around the world can communicate directly with each other, it is even more important how normal citizens behave and represent themselves. Society and people also share responsibility in the education of their fellow citizens. It is not just the job of the government and school, just like the mother and father is also responsible for teaching their child. We are all responsible for this world and for each other. If Americans allow their president to wage war in Iraq, all Americans are partially responsible. Why? Because they have some power (no matter how little) to try to change things.

    You’re right about many other things. Yes, most people around the world don’t really care about the Olympics or Tibet or whatever political controversy is currently going on. Yes, most people just want to pursue a happy life for themselves. Yes, boycotting the Western media and western companies is not a shortcut to empowering the Chinese people or China. And yes, patriotism can be a good thing, but it shouldn’t be the only thing. Patriotism is more than just annoucing that you love your country, it should be about making your country a better place for everyone so everyone wants to come visit or live there.

    I’d like to share this post we had over at CNR recently about how different people in different countries feel about each other. I think it shows some very interesting things, especially the differences between the United States and China.

  7. Thanks for your post. Some of your views are really reasonable, especially your reviews on the politics’ inevitable involved.. So actually I am not going to argue about your views. I think maybe I was just using some improper words.

    1) I’m also very very feeling very sorry for those who publicly spamming the girl’s real information on the internet.
    They are not protecting, they are just starting another war.
    2) I’ve never been to Tibet so I kept silent. I am NOT persuading the “other side” to be silent, I’m just talking to those people who knows nothing to shut up (both sides)

    Well, my “PS2″ are just aim to some particular Chinese “patriotism”. As for the normal people being involved in politics, I know what you mean. However in the mainland of China, many people are out of control (mentally or physically). They are easy to be angry(they even don’t know why) and their flippancy might just mess things up. They need to be educated well, study the truth and basic knowledge before they take their responsibilities for the society, and unfortunately I’m afraid this process might take as long as a generation to complete.

    I know the education I have had is really insufficient and I am reading books everyday, trying my best to study the society, but most “politics-uneducated” just took granted that they know everything. It’s terrible for them to take the “responsibilities”, anyway, they just need time.

  8. Yes, I understand what you’re saying and I agree with you. We have to accept that there will always be people who are “out of control (mentally or physically)” in the real world. We can never have a perfect society where everyone is perfectly educated and informed. However, because of that fact, we must realize how important it is for us to do our best to communicate with each other more. Only when there is more information and discussion between people can we, as a society, make better decisions and limit the potential damage that extremists may cause. We can never get rid of extremists, but we have to increase the number of rational, fair, balanced, and reasonable people.

  9. I can’t agree with you more.

    if lots of our people is living in a hell , a fun game hosted on it just make it looks more evil.

    For me, and almost all my friends, the Olympics means nothing, maybe that is just because I am a pragmatic man. We Chinese care more about our life, but not Olympics. In fact, born and living in this country, we all can feel the pain, despair and inhibition everywhere. Olympics? It is nothing to do with me, I am just struggling for a living, what I am worry about is CPI, salary, job, house and my child’s milk powder.

    To love our motherland is a good character, but it’s not just an action of updating our MSN signatures.

    You are rihgt, but in fact most people, who updated their MSN signatures or told somebody else to reject carefour, are just some guys who had nothing to invlove in their daily life. Maybe these actions showed their vacuity and vapidity. That is to say, only few of them can do something significative or estimable, in my view.

    At last, I have to say, the west media are so disappointing and queasily, like CCTV, just so so so.

    What a faulty world! How sad!

    Where is my ideal of media and journalism, now they are blowin in the wind.

  10. Re: The German guy:
    No, you say, “Well, 178cm is pretty tall. And people in Southern China tend to be shorter than people in Northern China.” Because it’s true. Eastern Europeans tend to be very tall, whereas East Asians tend to be not as tall as them. He meant no insult by it, and it’s silly of you to make it out like he did.

    Even as a Chinese, I can understand this. Why can’t you?

  11. One of my friend from Australia(he’s a100% Aussie) just said the following when I posted sth about these days about China on the forum I usually go:

    (Quote):
    The United Nations recognise the region the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China; it is apart of China.
    The Agreement of the Central People’s Government and the Local Government of Tibet on Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet was signed by the 14th Dalia Lama proclaiming Chinese sovereignty of Tibet.

    In 1959 the Lhasa Rebellion occured, which led to the exile of the Tibet Autonomous Region’s government and the 14th Dalai Lama and the decrease in actual autonomy in the region in order to prevent further behaviour.

    The Exiled Tibetan Government’s territorial claim extends well beyond and territorial claim of the last several centuries, extending as far as Lanzhou and Chengdu; almost 20% of the entire Chinese Territory.

    The Free Tibet is not a claim of the Autonomous Region of Tibet, it extends well beyond that if you entirely agree with a Free Tibet. So far as if you could imagine 13 States of the United States seperating.

    The claim of the exiled government is outrageous, and it seems to be something that alot of pro-Tibetan people do not fully understand.

    This is the first political Olympic Games since 1980/1984, and it really should not have become a political games.

    Boycotting all products and materials Made in China would mean the cease of use of over 80% of the entire world’s product and materials. That is the percentage of products that wear the Made in China brand. This is as nonsense as renaming French Fries to Freedom Fries or the German Shepard to Alsatian during Anti-German sentiment in WW1, it is a knee-jerk reaction that some how garners media and public attention yet has no real effect on the intended target.

    The Government of Australia, my country, recognises Chinese sovereignty over Tibet. Until that decision changes and until the United Nations decision changes my opinion shall not change either.

  12. Maybe I am misleading or you are misunderstanding? I did not mean he insult me, I just mean that SOME Chinese guys might take granted for conversations like that. However physically, people apparently like to be regarded taller and stronger, they can do something to help.

    You can understand it and I can, but some can’t. Maybe this article is more for other Chinese :)

  13. Your Australian friend has a lot of things right, but a few things wrong. For one thing, he’s at least done some reasonable research into the situation, but some of his comments either respond to other comments on that forum we cannot see, or they’re oversimplifying a complex situation with a variety of motivations and professed goals.

    For example, we need to ascertain just exactly what the exiled Tibetan government wants. In 1959, they wanted to throw out the Chinese they allowed in earlier. But what about now? As the official top-most representative of the exiled Tibetan government, what has the Dalai Lama been asking for in recent history? Independence? More autonomy? What does “autonomy” mean? Has he continued to deny Chinese sovereignty or has he publically acknowledged that Tibet is now a part of China? Has he demanded an independent Tibet that includes Lanzhou and Chengdu? What is he asking?

    The CCP government insists that the Dalai Lama wants independence and many Chinese believe that whole-heartedly. Many in the West see the Dalai Lama repeatedly acknowledge that Tibet cannot be independent from China anymore but desires more “autonomy” from the Chinese CCP central government. The CCP government refuses to discuss what the Dalai Lama’s “more autonomy” entails and just dismisses him as a “splittist.” Without communication, there is no understanding. Without understanding, there is no solution. But maybe the CCP doesn’t care. After all, why should the central government care what some exiled Tibetans or existing Tibetans want for their homeland? Do they even have the right to petition their government and rulers? Why should the central government listen to the people of the land they control and govern?

    Those are questions too few people are asking. Instead, people are spending their time maligning each other.

    This is NOT the first political Olympic Games since 1980/84. Have we already forgotten the Centennial Olympic Park terrorist bombing for the 1996 Atlanta Games that killed two people and injured over 100 other people? The Olympics have ALWAYS been political because it is an event that gets people’s attention from all around the world. Anytime you have attention, you will have people trying to advance their causes. To imply that is to put your head into the sand and refuse to acknowledge fundamental reality.

    A major part of why the 2008 Olympic Games feels so much more “politicized” is because the CCP government has difficulty accepting that dissent is part of reality. They have trouble “letting go” and want to control far more aspects of the Games and people’s perception of the Games than the host governments of many previous “less political” Games. The more China is insecure, the more those with agendas against China will pressure China.

    Every government recognizes Chinese sovereignty over Tibet, even the exiled government of the Dalai Lama. Not every person does, however, and they have their reasons why. Many of those reasons are misguided, or even completely ridiculous. I personally think China and the Chinese can do a better job of helping these people better understand the China-Tibet issue by communicating honestly instead of denying that there are problems and refusing to address those problems. It is difficult for the West to control their curiosity and suspicion when we tell them that all Tibetans love China but they can see Tibetans violently attacking Han Chinese. We condemn the violent actions of Iraqi insurrectionists against American troops in Iraq, but we at least are trying to figure out the reasons for their anger and use of violence.

    We may never be able to stop all violence or all violent people even if we try to understand the reasons and try to solve the problems. However, doing the latter is more responsible than just pretending there are no problems.

  14. I have some questions to be discussed:

    1. It’s true that Olympic Games have political factors and we really don’t need to deny that. But “Have political factors” == “Political”?

    2. Let’s consider the potential political intention expressed through Olympic Games. Is it so bad so evil that it simplely should not ever exist in Olympics?

    Here is my personal opinion:
    1. Usually the following factors are the three most important ones for Olympics—-Culture, Commerce and Politics. You surely can not call Beijing Olympics “a political one” unless Politics takes more than 50% of the importance, right?

    2. What kind of political idea is the Chinese Government want to express through Beijing Olympics? Racial superiority? Chauvinism? Or superiority of Socialism? Since the first two can’t be true and the third at least not the most important one, Chinese government shouldn’t be criticized on this matter, even with its political intentions expressed. The most important political factor is to provide western world a window, an excellent chance to see a growing China. But some western countries, while at one hand criticize China for not totally opening up, at the other hand criticize China for showing off power through Olympic Games. So what do we have that really worth showing off? GDP? Superior Military power? Or better universities? Absolutely not! So to some extent, the saying that western countries are jealous about China is just inaccurate. They don’t really envy us, they’re just not happy to see people can lead a “not so bad life”. They just feel losing face to admit a so called “dictatorship” can run China well.

  15. the world is getting worse n worse so we also have the right to save the earth.we r also living in this earth.most of the carbon-dioxide and carbon-monoxide is producing by the automobiles.cng dont effect he environment .so cant we use only cng in automobiles.this is so horrible. so we have to stop using co2……we the people of the earth should make a quote thar whoever runs co2 on their automobiles should be put to prison 4 6months .the only the will be surving.not only all the human beings all the nature would be destroyed. so do u agree with my coment……….

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